Publications

 

Storage Guides

IPI Media Storage Quick Reference

IPI Media Storage Quick Reference

Peter Z. Adelstein (2009), 2nd Edition. This publication distills key preservation issues for still and motion picture film, glass plate negatives, magnetic tape, photographic paper prints, inkjet prints, CDs, and DVDs. The guide helps the user better understand how the storage environment affects them, both individually and in mixed collections. The IPI Media Storage Quick Reference was created for today's collection-care professionals, who must provide long-term preservation-quality storage for a growing diversity of collection materials — often in a single storage area. The booklet's text, diagrams, and tables present the information in an easily accessible format. 10 pages, comb-bound, plus two-sided wheel. $50, no quantity discount. You can click here to download a PDF version of the booklet, but it does not include the wheel.

Order the IPI Media Storage Quick Reference Guide >>

IPI Storage Guide for Acetate Film

IPI Storage Guide for Acetate Film

James M. Reilly (1993). Valuable quantitative data in practical, easy-to-use form. This guide provides essential information on the effects of temperature and humidity on the rate of acetate film base decay and is a vital tool for evaluating and planning storage environments for all types of acetate film. The booklet discusses environmental specifications for film storage and explains the relationship between temperature, humidity, and the time it takes for "vinegar syndrome" — the slow, chemical decomposition of acetate plastics — to affect fresh film. 24-pages, soft cover, plus wheel, graphs, and table. This publication (with wheel) is no longer in print. You can download the PDF version for free below (no wheel).

Download the PDF version

Storage Guide for Color Photographic Materials

Storage Guide for Color Photographic Materials

James M. Reilly (1998). Published by the University of the State of New York, New York State Program for the Conservation and Preservation of Library Material. This book and accompanying wheel of environmental conditions explains how and why color images fade, why they need special storage, and what can be done to make them last as long as possible. 48 pages, soft cover. This publication (with wheel) is no longer in print. You can download the PDF version for free below (no wheel).

Download the PDF version

(Note: this is a 19 MB file, it may take a few minutes to download.)

Consumer Guides

IPI seeks sponsors for new titles in our consumer guide series. Corporate donations are used to compile and publish much-needed information for the average photographer-consumer. These booklets are written in lay language and deal impartially with the various issues surrounding the long-term survival of family photo collections. These 8-page pamphlets are offset-printed in full color—ideal for workshop handouts! Email your request to: ipiwww@rit.edu and please put the words "Consumer Guide Request" in the subject line. In the body, specify which guide you'd like and the quantity. Note: For large quantities, shipping & handling charges will apply. 
 

A Consumer Guide to Traditional and Digital Print Stability

A Consumer Guide to Traditional and Digital Print Stability

Created by Image Permanence Institute with support from Creative Memories (2004). Most of us don’t think about how long a color print will last when it’s new. We are likely to consider its long-term stability only when it has started to fade or discolor, usually after it’s too late to do anything to save it in its original form. The fact is that no image will last forever. Heat, humidity, light, air pollutants, and mishandling all can shorten the life of a color print. This guide is intended to help readers gain insight into some of the causes of image deterioration and learn ways to make their photographic and digital color prints last longer. Download the PDF.

A Consumer Guide for the Recovery of Water-Damaged Traditional and Digital Prints

A Consumer Guide for the Recovery of Water-Damaged Traditional and Digital Prints

Created by Image Permanence Institute with support from Creative Memories (2007). Disasters caused by fire and water threaten the preservation of photographic prints. Fire often results in the complete destruction of photographs, with no chance of recovery. The only practical way to reduce the chances of fire loss is to equip the storage area with adequate fire protection, such as sprinklers, or to store records in fire protection safes. Water damage is another story and is the focus of this publication. Download the PDF.

A Consumer Guide to Modern Photo Papers

A Consumer Guide to Modern Photo Papers

Created by Image Permanence Institute with support from Sakura of America (2009). As photography has moved from the darkroom to the computer lab, the technologies for printing photos have changed. The age of digital photography has ushered in changes that affect everything from the cost and quality to the look and feel of photographs being printed today. In order to make the best decisions for purchasing photo papers or, at the very least, to understand why some modern photos don’t look or feel like those of only a decade ago, consumers need to understand the modern digital print papers. Download the PDF.

A Consumer Guide to Understanding Permanence Testing

A Consumer Guide to Understanding Permanence Testing

Created by Image Permanence Institute with support from Eastman Kodak Company (2009). Color photography has been around for well over fifty years, but during the last decade there have been radical changes in the way color images are created by cameras. Early digital prints sometimes faded rapidly, and this led to questions about the longevity of these modern color prints, the techniques used to evaluate their useful life, and the care that must be exercised for their preservation. Download the PDF.

A Consumer Guide to Materials for Preservation Framing and the Display of Photographic Images

A Consumer Materials for Preservation Framing and the Display of Photographic Images

Created by Image Permanence Institute with support from Tru Vue (2010). Framing and displaying your photographs (both traditional and modern digital) is one of the best ways to enjoy them and share them with your friends and family; however, it can also place great stress on them, resulting in fading, yellowing, embrittlement, and other types of decay, and ultimately reducing their life span. The goal of this guide is to help you understand why photos on display become damaged and how thoughtful framing and display practices can help keep your pictures safe. Let’s start with describing the various parts of a good-quality frame. Download the PDF.

Books

IPI’s Guide to Sustainable Preservation Practices for Managing Storage Environments

IPI’s Guide to Sustainable Preservation Practices for Managing Storage Environments

The goal is an optimal preservation environment—one that achieves the best possible preservation of collections with the least possible consumption of energy, and is sustainable over time. This guide is designed to help institutions maintain the best climate for preservation with the least consumption of energy. Funding provided by the National Endowment for the Humanities, Division of Preservation and Access, Education & Training Grant Program. 112 pages, spiral bound, 8.5” x 11”, no quantity discount. Price: $25.

Order IPI's Guide to Sustainable Preservation Practices for Managing Storage Environments >>

The Albumen and Salted Paper Book

The Albumen and Salted Paper Book

James M. Reilly (1980). Second edition (2012). Published by the RIT Cary Graphic Arts Press. The Albumen and Salted Paper Book is a descriptive history of the major photographic printing processes that were used between the years 1840-1895. These first 50 years of photography established a tradition of individual experimentation and craftsmanship where each photographer participated in the manufacture of the printing materials that were used. Albumen print and salted paper print were the ordinary, all-purpose materials of the time—albumen print is the second most common type of photograph ever made. This book describes both the technical information of these historical materials and offers the reader a very organized approach to this interesting process. 188 pages, hard cover, 6" x 9". $34.99, no quantity discount.

Order The Albumen and Salted Paper Book >>

Care and Identification of 19th-Century Photographic Prints

Care and Identification of 19th-Century Photographic Prints

James M. Reilly (1986). Fourth printing (2009). Published by the Image Permanence Institute. Over the years, archivists, curators, librarians, and many others who care for and care about historical photographs have used this important publication as their complete reference handbook on all aspects of the identification and preservation of 19th-century photographic and photomechanical prints. The text presents technical information in plain, understandable language and is supported throughout by high-quality color reproductions showing the various print types and their forms of deterioration. The fine details of print structure are pictured in numerous photomicrographs. A key feature of the book is its practical, detailed system for 19th-century print identification. The pull-out flowchart that comes with each book is an important component in this system. 116 pages, soft cover, 8.5" x 11". $60, no quantity discount.

Order Care & Identification of 19th Century Photographic Prints >>

Permanent Images: A Personal and Technical Memoir

Permanent Images: A Personal and Technical Memoir

Dr. Peter Z. Adelstein (2012). This memoir is a look into the past of an accomplished research scientist who has been in the field of image permanence for over sixty-three years. There have been many changes in our understanding of image stability, in recording materials, and in the institutions that are concerned with permanence behavior. In this memoir, Dr. Adelstein recounts significant milestones over the past few decades that are sure to be of interest among scientists and anyone interested in the history of image permanence. In addition, Dr. Adelstein hopes that his personal reflections of some of the outstanding personalities who contributed greatly to the field will be of general interest. 114 pages, hard cover, 6" x 9". $50, no quantity discount.

Order Permanent Images: A Personal and Technical Memoir >>

Digital Imaging for Photographic Collections

Digital Imaging for Photographic Collections: Foundations for Technical Standards, 2nd edition

Franziska S. Frey and James M. Reilly (2006). Published by the Image Permanence Institute Digital Imaging for Photographic CollectionsLibraries, archives, and museums are considering digitization as a viable option for preserving their aging and deteriorating photograph collections. This 52-page booklet offers guidelines that these cultural institutions may use in their efforts to convert their photographic collections to digital form. It identifies the key issues affecting image quality, clarifies the choices that must be made before embarking on a digitizing project, and explores ways to measure digital image quality. This publication is the result of IPI research funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities. This publication is no longer in print. You can download the PDF version for free below.

Download the PDF version

New Tools for Preservation

New Tools for Preservation: Assessing Long-Term Environmental Effects on Library and Archives Collections

James M. Reilly, Douglas W. Nishimura, and Edward Zinn (2005) Published by the Commission on Preservation and Access. This publication introduces time-weighted preservation index (TWPI) technology, a concept developed at IPI that provides a new way to measure and quantify the effects of temperature and humidity changes on the preservation quality of storage environments for collections of organic materials. 35 pages, soft cover, 8 1/2" x 11". $25, no quantity discount.

Order New Tools for Preservation >>

Pioneers of Photography: Their Achievements in Science and Technology

Pioneers of Photography: Their Achievements in Science and Technology

The Society for Imaging Science and Technology (1986). Published by The Society for Imaging Science and Technology. This unique collection of 26 authoritative essays by leading historians, scientists, and inventors tracks the evolution of the medium through its landmark inventions and key technological developments over 150 years. Authors from the United States, Asia, and Europe, have devoted their lifelong studies and careers to the areas discussed in the book. Some were themselves the pioneers who gave birth to new aspects of photography, while others contributed innovations that modified and expanded existing practices. The essays in this book were selected from the proceedings of the three-day First International Congress: Pioneers of Photographic Science Technology, sponsored by IS&T. 285 pages, soft cover. $70, no quantity discount.

Order Pioneers of Photography >>

From Silver Image to Silver Anniversary: A look back at 25 years of award-winning preservation research at RIT's Image Permanence Institute

From Silver Image to Silver Anniversary: A look back at 25 years of award-winning preservation research at RIT's Image Permanence Institute

Image Permanence Institute (2010). This publication brings together in one place the highlights of the past quarter century of IPI research. These are the projects and perspectives that have shaped our vision and engaged our scientific curiosity. IPI has always had in mind that preservation research is an applied discipline in which the laboratory is only the beginning, and technical papers are not the end of the task before us. We have been rewarded with awards and honors—and with generous support for our work—but the most meaningful reward is seeing our research change the preservation field for the better.

Download the PDF

Posters

Photographic Negatives: Nature and Evolution of Processes

Photographic Negatives: Nature and Evolution of Processes

Maria Fernanda Valverde, published by the Mellon Advanced Residency Program in Photograph Conservation (George Eastman House/Image Permanence Institute), 2004 Photographic Negatives. This attractive poster introduces the viewer/reader to the technical evolution of photographic negatives over time. The poster features a timeline and images and text describing the eight most important negative types. A complementary PDF booklet is available for download. It offers detailed discussion of the chemical and physical properties of these negatives, recommendations for their safe storage, keys to their identification, their place in photographic history, and much more. Poster (28" x 42"). Download the complementary booklet in PDF format. $10, no quantity discount.

Order the Photographic Negatives Poster >>

Knowing and Protecting Motion Picture Film Poster

Knowing and Protecting Motion Picture Film Poster

Published by the Image Permanence Institute and developed with contributions from recipients of the both the AMIA Image Permanence Institute Internship in Preservation Research Award and recipients of the Image Permanence Institute L. Jeffrey Selznick School of Film Preservation Internship Award. Knowing and Protecting Motion Picture Film, 2010. This large poster (47" x 35") takes the viewer through the fascinating history of motion picture film materials. Using microscopy-imaging techniques, this poster features the striking characteristics of twelve distinct film materials from the silent era to present day. It features a time-line of motion-picture technology, a wide variety of motion picture film processes, tips for material identification, and basic knowledge on film formats and soundtracks. Also included is practical advice for film examination, a glossary of technical terms, and critical information needed for long-term preservation. Most notably, this poster is seen as an educational tool for understanding and ultimately preserving motion picture film materials. Poster (47" x 35"). Click for enlarged views of the poster. $10, no quantity discount.

Order the Motion Picture Film Poster >>

Research Project Reports

Technical Report

Sulfiding Protection for Silver Images—Technical Report

Sulfiding Protection for Silver Images, 1991. James M. Reilly and Kaspars M. Cupriks. IPI research project report to the National Endowment for the Humanities, Division of Preservation and Access. 

The sulfiding project, jointly funded by NEH's Office of Preservation and the Records Program of NHPRC, was a supplemental grant to previous efforts which investigated the value of selenium treatment for microfilm. This resulted in discovering some shortcomings in selenium treatment, and also led to a promising alternative approach, known as polysulfide treatment. It was hoped that polysulfide would protect microfilm against oxidative image attack, thus greatly extending its useful life, even in adverse storage environments. The sulfiding project consisted of a thorough scientific exploration of polysulfide treatment, seeking to document its benefits, identify its possible drawbacks, and learn more about how to use it in practice. The main project goal was to determine if polysulfide can be recommended for use in preservation microfilming applications, and if so, put forward such a recommendation, together with the required technical procedures for actual use. This report is no longer in print. You can download the PDF version for free below.

Download the PDF version

Technical Report

Enclosures and Air Pollution in Image Preservation—Technical Report

Enclosures and Air Pollution in Image Preservation, 1997. Edward Zinn, James M. Reilly, and Douglas W. Nishimura. IPI research project report to the National Endowment for the Humanities, Division of Preservation and Access. 

This three-year project, Enclosures and Air Pollution in Image Preservation (PS-20741-93), built upon the work completed in a previous grant funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH), Air Pollution Effects on Library Microforms (PS-20273-89). Although the earlier project outlined in broad strokes the relative sensitivity of several commonly used micrographic products to high levels of pollutant gases, it did not attempt to evaluate the potential threat posed to common imaging materials—color and black-and-white photographs and films—by ambient levels of pollution in libraries and archives.

Archivists and librarians can use the data gathered in this project to interpret air quality measurements made in their photographic storage areas and to guide engineering professionals in the design of new storage facilities. Black-and-white images require very low levels of airborne contaminants, but the data show that color photographs are more tolerant of long-term exposure to low levels of airborne oxidants. While multiple levels of enclosures (plastic sleeves, folders, boxes, and closed cabinets) can together mitigate somewhat the attack by pollutants, archivists should not rely on enclosures for protection against pollutant effects. Gas phase filtration equipment still has an important role to play in photograph, cinema, and microfilm storage. You can download the PDF version for free below.

Download the PDF version

Technical Report

Environment and Enclosures in Film Preservation—Technical Report

Environment and Enclosures in Film Preservation, 1997. Jean-Louis Bigourdan and James M. Reilly. IPI research project report to the National Endowment for the Humanities, Division of Preservation and Access.

This three-year project was a continuation of two previous grant projects funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities, Preservation of Safety Film (PS-20159-88) and New Approaches to Safety Film Preservation (PS-20445-91). While those two projects dealt with the relationship between macroenvironmental conditions and the stability of various types of film, this project is concerned with the influence of microenvironments. It focuses on two major objectives: (1) the effectiveness of different enclosure configurations, which is covered in Phases I, II, and III, and (2) the rates of temperature and moisture equilibration, which are covered in Phases IV and V. The emphasis in this investigation has been on practical recommendations that would benefit archivists and collection managers who strive to preserve cellulose acetate photographic film. This report is no longer in print. You can download the PDF version for free below.

Download the PDF version